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If you get frustrated with caring for your ColorOrchid, we completely understand!! There are thousands of books and articles telling you the proper way to keep your Phalaenopsis alive but you should not be expected to read through it all. We have done the research for you and we are here to help. The Care Help section of the website will provide a quick and easy guide for Phalaenopsis care. If your ColorOrchid has an issue which is identifiable by a visual symptom, feel free to browse through the photos first.

Leaves
  • Select a problem

      leaf discoloration droopy leaf yellowing leaves yellow leaf spots
  • leaf discoloration

    Discoloration

    This discoloration happens because of the plant variety. Do not be concerned, because the leaf is healthy!

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  • droopy leaf

    Droopy leaf

    A droopy leaf usually means a dry plant. You should feel your orchid leaves and pay attention for any signs of shriveling or softness. The best way to remedy this situation is by removing your orchid from the ceramic and running it under a faucet with warm water. Slowly turn the plant and allow the water to completely drain before returning the plant to the ceramic. The roots should begin to change color from a light grey to a dark green. It is ok to let your orchid go a little dry, but do not wait too long because the flowers may start to fall!

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  • yellowing leaves

    Yellowing leaves

    Yellowing of the leaves can be a result of one of two things: the shriveling of an old leaf or a symptom of a fungus called fusarium. If the yellowing stops after one leaf, then the plant is just losing an old leaf and there is no danger to your plant. If the yellowing continues to multiple leaves, and the base of your plant begins to turn yellow or black, like the image seen here, then your plant is infected with fusarium. We recommend throwing away your plant immediately. It is very difficult to cure fusarium. Be very careful when selecting your orchids upon purchasing. Choose only orchids with 4 or more leaves and make sure all the leaves are healthy green.

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  • yellow leaf spots

    Yellow leaf spots

    If your plant's leaves develop yellow leaf spots with brown centers, like this image, then your plant is infected with a bacteria called pseudomona. We recommend that you cut the leaf, in half, with disinfected scissors 2 inches beneath the infected spot. This may stop the spread of the pseudomona. We do not recommend using any chemical to cure the plant as pseudomona is very difficult to cure. Be sure to keep your orchid in sanitary conditions and try not to handle your orchid frequently to help prevent the spread of harmful bacteria.

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Flowers/Buds
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      damaged petal early bud blast severe bud blast old flowers dry flowers droopy flowers
  • damaged petal

    Damaged petal

    The "droopiness" seen here is caused by a laceration in the petal which most likely happened during transit or handling. This individual flower is permanently damaged and will not recover. Be sure not to mistake this symptom for under-watering. You may remove the petal or flower for a better appearance.

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  • early bud blast

    Bud blast (early)

    Your orchid is experiencing bud blast when the mature buds appear to be shriveled and begin to fall off the plant. This can be caused by a number of different problems, including under-watering, cold temperatures, low humidity, or damage to the buds. If the orchids leaves appear healthy, and it is being kept in an area with a temperature above 60°F, then the cause is probably bud damage. This could of happened during transit or handling when the bud was developing. These buds will not flower and will fall off. We recommend taking extra care when removing the orchid from the sleeve as the younger buds are extremely sensitive. We recommend paying close attention to your climate to make sure the bud blast is not being caused by another problem.

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  • severe bud blast

    Bud blast (severe)

    Your orchid is experiencing bud blast when the mature buds appear to be shriveled and begin to fall off the plant. This can be caused by a number of different problems, including under-watering, cold temperatures, low humidity, or damage to the buds. If the orchids leaves appear healthy, and it is being kept in an area with a temperature above 60°F, then the cause is probably bud damage. This could of happened during transit or handling when the bud was developing. These buds will not flower and will fall off. We recommend taking extra care when removing the orchid from the sleeve as the younger buds are extremely sensitive. We recommend paying close attention to your climate to make sure the bud blast is not being caused by another problem.

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  • old flowers

    Old flowers

    Once your orchid has completely bloomed, the flowers will eventually begin to shrivel because of age. These flowers will eventually fall from the plant. Your orchid should survive for several weeks after it has completely bloomed, so be sure that you are still watering correctly. Some varieties are stronger than others and may survive longer, so do not be alarmed if your white orchid lasts longer than your pink one!

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  • dry flowers

    Dry flowers

    If your flower appears transparent or shriveled, as seen in the bottom flower of this image, then you are under-watering your plant. We recommend increasing the amount of water you use every week, water more frequently, or change your watering method. A way to check if your Phalaenopsis needs water is by placing your finger into the media several inches. If the media feels damp, do not water. If the media is dry, water immediately. At time of watering, you may also remove the Phalaenopsis from its decorative pot and place the plant under warm running water. Spin the orchid as the water flows through the media. Once you see the roots turn from grey to green, you may place the orchid back into the decorative pot after the water has drained completely through the plastic pot.

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  • droopy flowers

    Droopy flowers

    Droopy flower petals are caused by a dry plant. If you begin to notice the dorsal sepal (top petal) begin to fold back, it is time to give your orchid a good watering. The best way to remedy this situation is by removing your orchid from the ceramic and running it under a faucet with warm water. Slowly turn the plant and allow the water to completely drain before returning the plant to the ceramic.The roots should begin to change color from a light grey to a dark green. Your flowers will return to their normal state so do not be alarmed. The damage is not permanent. It is ok to let your orchid go a little dry, but do not wait too long because the flowers may start to fall!

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Roots
  • Select a problem

      dead root grey roots root tip new roots happy roots
  • dead root

    Dead root

    Do not be alarmed if the roots of your orchid begin to grow outside of the pot. These are aerial roots trying to capture nutrients from the air. If these roots appear to be shriveled and dry, then they are dead. This happens due to low humidity but it will not affect the health of your orchid. The plant has many more roots to survive. If the roots are grey but appear to be thick with green toward the bottom, then these roots are healthy. The roots have a coating called "velamen" that appears grey when dry and green when wet.

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  • grey roots

    Grey roots

    Do not be alarmed if the roots of your orchid begin to grow outside of the pot. These are aerial roots trying to capture nutrients from the air. If these roots appear to be shriveled and dry, then they are dead. This happens due to low humidity but it will not affect the health of your orchid. The plant has many more roots to survive. If the roots are grey but appear to be thick with green toward the bottom, then these roots are healthy. The roots have a coating called "velamen" that appears grey when dry and green when wet.

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  • root tip

    Root tip

    A root with a reddish tip is a sign of a happy plant with new root growth.

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  • new roots

    New roots

    New roots may begin to grow from your orchid. Do not mistake this root for a new stem, it will not produce any flowers.

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  • happy roots

    Happy roots

    If you remove your orchid from its pot, you should be able to observe thick, green roots. If all the roots appear to be grey and shriveled, it may be time to water your orchid. Be sure to test the substrate for dampness with your finger before watering.

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Stems
  • Select a problem

      broken stem stem leaf
  • broken stem

    Broken stem

    Sometimes during transit and handling the stem may break. Once this happens, the flowers and buds on the broken piece will die, as they are unable to receive water. At this point, the orchid is beyond repair and the damage is permanent. Be sure to look for undamaged orchids at the stores when selecting your plant.

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  • stem leaf

    Stem leaf

    If you have a plant with a leaf on its stem, do not be alarmed. This is a sign of high temperatures in the greenhouse for a short time during the growth of stem. This will not affect the plant.

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